Hi, I'm Kim

Hi, I’m Kim Christensen, M.Om., Dipl.OM, L.Ac. I’m a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and owner of Constellation Acupuncture & Healing Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Back before going to school and becoming a healthcare practitioner, Affairs of Living was my creative outlet while healing from chronic health issues. These days, I'm in a new phase of life, and this website is no longer updated.

Want to stay up to date? Check out my new website www.constellationacu.com.

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Unless otherwise noted, all recipes on this blog are free of gluten, peanuts, soy, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, shellfish, cane sugar, oranges, and yeast. Most recipes are also free of egg, dairy, and tree nuts (if used, reliable substitutions will be provided for these when possible). Check out my recipe index for a full list of recipes by category. 

Recommend Cabbage Slaw with Sorrel and Sesame (gluten-free, ACD, vegan, raw option) (Email)

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My coworker E and I have a wonderfully reciprocal relationship.  We trade produce, health tips, and knowledge about various things. Most of the time I feel like I get the better end of the bargain - she is incredibly generous and knowledgeable, and I have a hard time keeping up! The other day she brought me a bunch of lovely sorrel leaves from her garden.  I was thrilled! I'm growing it in my garden, but it hasn't quite gotten large enough to harvest yet.

If you aren't familiar with sorrel, it is a perennial herb with a tart, sour, almost lemony flavor.  The flavor is due to the high amount of oxalic acid present in the leaves. If you are particularly sensitive to oxalates, you may want to steer clear of sorrel. In large quantities, everyone should be careful - too much sorrel can be toxic! But a small amount here and there won't harm you. So, if you can handle oxalates, find sorrel immediately, because it is delicious.   It is used all over the world in various dishes from soups to salads to meat dishes.  It is delicious with butter over fish. Because it has a tart, sour, lemony flavor, it like adding it to slaws and salads for an acidic bite.  Minneapolis is in the midst of a heat wave, and I am craving raw vegetables non-stop, so I used some of my gifted sorrel for a tasty slaw. 


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